Menu Home Login
SAChE Products Process Safety Beacon Student Certificate Program Faculty Workshops CSB Video Room Dow Lab Safety Academy
News Committee Members Links
Contact Us

Products

SAChE Products can be used and adopted to learning environments including students in many different fields (such as chemical and mechanical engineering as well as chemistry and materials science) and practicing engineers (such as in safety training programs). We attempt to put the materials in an easy to use format, and modifications can be made to the materials to fit the circumstances.



Inherently Safer Design Conflicts and Decisions

Sponsors

Dennis C. Hendershot (Rohm and Haas Company, retired)
John Murphy (United States Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board, retired)

Description

Inherently Safer Design (ISD) is a different philosophy for addressing safety issues in the design and operation of chemical plants. ISD focuses on eliminating or significantly reducing hazards. Often, the traditional approach to managing chemical process safety has accepted the existence and magnitude of hazards in a process, and efforts to reduce risk have concentrated on managing the risk associated with the hazards. Where feasible, ISD provides more robust and reliable risk management, and has the potential to make the chemical processing technology simpler and more economical in many cases.

However, it is important to recognize that any change to a technology or product, even a change intended to enhance safety, has the potential to introduce new hazards and risks, and to increase the magnitude of existing hazards and risks. It is important to recognize this potential and fully evaluate any change in technology with regard to all hazards and potential risks. Thus, a process or product which is inherently safer with respect to one or more hazards may introduce new risks, and these must be considered in choosing the appropriate process technology. This module describes these issues with respect to ISD, with examples of ISD conflicts. Once the potential conflicts are understood, the problem becomes a traditional engineering optimization problem, with the objective of selecting a technology option which generates the greatest overall value considering all of the conflicting requirements.

The basic principles of Inherently Safer Design (ISD) are covered in more detail in the SACHE module “Introduction to Inherently Safer Design”, distributed to SACHE members in 2006 and available for download by SACHE members on this site.

Spanish translation: Available for one or more files.

Student access: All files are available to students logged into the site.

Downloads (213)

Log in for downloads of this product.

Reviews (0)


Risk Assessment

Sponsors

Ralph W. Pike (Louisiana State University)

Description

This web browser-based, self-study course is designed to provide a working knowledge of risk assessment, management and reduction as applied to chemical plants and petroleum refineries. It includes descriptions of methods with examples and exercises, and it requires about three hours to complete. Although developed for chemical engineering faculty and students, the course material can also be used as part of the safety orientation at industrial facilities. Topics focus on the detection, prevention and mitigation of risks including:

  • Screening Analysis Techniques
  • Checklist Reviews
  • Preliminary Hazards Analysis
  • Safety Audit
  • What-if Analysis
  • Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA)
  • Hazard and Operability Studies (HAZOPS)
  • Fault Tree and Event Tree Analysis
  • Chemical Plume and Dispersion Analysis
  • Explosion and Fire Analysis
  • Assessment of Health Effects
  • Quantified Risk Assessment

The course material prepares students to develop the information needed in plant design in a senior-level design course (e.g., a HAZOP on a process flow diagram) or provides background to topics discussed in a process safety course. The course material emphasizes how the methods for risk assessment, management, and reduction are related and function together.

Much of the material in the course is summarized from: Risk Assessment and Risk Management for the Chemical Process Industry, H. R. Greenberg and J. J. Cramer, Editors, John Wiley and Sons, New York, NY (1991); and Process Synthesis and Design, A SeIf-lnstructional Problem Workbook, D. Kauffman, ETS International, Inc. Roanoke, VA (1992). These books are recommended for further details on the topics.

Although following the order of the material as presented is recommended, the course sections can be studied in any sequence if the person has adequate background, and there are links to move easily among topics.

This is a narrated course, and the text is available by clicking on a text icon on each of the topic slides. The text and slides can be modified. The course is in a zipped file to preserve the directory structure. After unzipping the file, start the course by pointing a browser to the file index1.html in the RiskAssessment folder.

Student access: All files are available to students logged into the site.

Downloads (719)

Log in for downloads of this product.

Reviews (0)


Seminar on Tank Failures

Sponsors

Ronald J. Willey (Northeastern University)

Description

Storage tanks are encountered in every process environment. This SACHE product covers three significant tank failures
  • BLEVE (boiling liquid expanding vapor explosion) in Mexico City (1984),
  • LNG (liquefied natural gas) tank failure in Cleveland (1944), and
  • diesel storage tank failure (1988).
Each case demonstrates a different root cause (secondary events due to an initial surrounding fire, materials compatibility issues with cryogenic materials, and flaws in a relocation project that did not follow codes and guidelines). This presentation concludes with a review of common failure modes for storage tanks and prevention measures. This presentation increases the student’s awareness of process safety requirements for storage tanks. It can be used effectively by university professors, or industrial trainers. This is a PowerPoint revision of the original 1993 SACHE product.

Downloads (207)

Log in for downloads of this product.

Reviews (0)


Seveso Accidental Release Case History

Sponsors

Ronald J. Willey (Northeastern University)

Description

This presentation describes a widely discussed case history that illustrates how minor engineering errors can cause significant problems; problems that should not be repeated. The accident was in Seveso, Italy in 1976. It was a small release of a dioxin that caused many serious injuries.

The package can be used in an undergraduate classroom or an industrial training session. The package can be modified to fit different contexts including: reaction engineering (runaway reactions), heat transfer (heat transport from the reactor walls to the liquid), mass transfer (the resultant dispersion of material from a release), and reaction stoichiometry. The entire module can be presented in about 50 minutes.

The Seveso case history is an especially good teaching module, showing how a minor problem and a minor release can cause very serious injuries. The root cause of this release included a poor engineering design, operator negligence, and poor supervision. The intent of this teaching module is to motivate engineers and supervisors to pay attention to the details.

This product includes five excellent problems and solutions that illustrate the lessons to be learned from this case history. The problems can be used in the following courses: a) Stoichiometry, b) Thermodynamics, c) Kinetics, d) Heat Transfer, and e) Ethics. Or they can be used in industrial training sessions in the areas of process design and engineering management.

Downloads (246)

Log in for downloads of this product.

Reviews (0)


Static Electricity as an Ignition Source

Sponsors

Konanur Manjunath (DOW Chemical)

Description

This PowerPoint presentation covers the fundamentals of selected ignition sources and control methods with an emphasis on static electricity. The presentation was developed to make it easy to jump or return to the desired sections which are:
  • Introduction and non-electrical ignition sources (fires, hot surfaces, and mechanically generated sparks)
  • Electrically generated sparks and electrical area classifications
  • Static electricity and electro-static charge generation
  • The meaning of the term “relaxation time”
  • Basics of grounding and bonding
  • Charge dissipation in dusts (solids) and how it differs in metals and liquids
  • Types of dust electro-static discharges
  • Induction charging
  • Summary
The chemical industry continues to have accidents due to static electricity. The CSB recently stated that “industry and safety professionals often lacked awareness of combustible dust hazards, and MSDSs ineffectively communicate to employers and workers the hazards of combustible dust explosions and ways to prevent them”. This presentation will help professionals become aware of static electricity as an ignition source and methods to prevent static charge buildup, thus reducing the potential for fires and explosions.

Downloads (87)

Log in for downloads of this product.

Reviews (0)


Hosting Provided By Universtiy of Arkansas - Chemical Engineering
Website Designed and Maintained by
Marquiste, Inc.
Best viewed in:
NS 6.0+ or IE 6.0+

Valid XHTML 1.0!

Valid CSS!