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SAChE Products can be used and adopted to learning environments including students in many different fields (such as chemical and mechanical engineering as well as chemistry and materials science) and practicing engineers (such as in safety training programs). We attempt to put the materials in an easy to use format, and modifications can be made to the materials to fit the circumstances.



Consequence Modeling Source Models I: Liquids & Gases

Sponsors

Jan Wagner (Oklahoma State University)

Description

This module was developed to help introduce issues of safety and loss prevention in undergraduate engineering courses. Each of the five major sections can be used independently, depending on the student's backgrounds.

Section 1 is an introduction to the role of source models in the risk assessment process. Section 2 introduces the basic information required to select or develop an appropriate source model for a given release scenario. The fundamental concepts of the 1st Law of Thermodynamics, the mechanical energy balance, and friction losses in pipes and fittings are reviewed briefly in Section 3. Section 4 deals with flow of liquids in pipes and orifices. The example problems are intended to introduce loss prevention issues, and they can be used in any fluid mechanics class. Section 5 presents the flow of ideal gas in orifices and pipes. This material may be appropriate in fluid mechanics or thermodynamics classes. The derivations of equations for compressible flow are intended to show the relationships between physical phenomena and the mathematical model; the fundamental concepts apply to ideal and real gases.

The module resources include text, accompanying PowerPoint presentations, student homework problems, and an instructor's solution manual.

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Green Engineering Tutorial

Sponsors

Hui Chen (Arizona State University)
David Shonnard (Michigan Technological University)

Description

Green Engineering is defined as the design, commercialization, and use of processes and products that are feasible and economical while minimizing risk to human health and the environment. This tutorial contains a detailed description of a systematic methodology for the design of greener and more profitable chemical processes. Concepts and methods that are suited for both early design screening assessments as well as thorough evaluations of detailed designs are presented. A tutorial is included with step-by-step instructions on the use of computer software for environmentally-conscious design. The software also includes algorithms for flowsheet costing as well as multi-criteria decision making. A case study comparing production of maleic anhydride from either n-butane or benzene is used to illustrate concepts and application of the software. This green engineering tutorial will benefit capstone design course instructors and students in chemical engineering, environmental engineering, pulp and paper science and engineering, and mineral processing. Computer programs used in the materials are available from David Shonnard at drshonna@mtu.edu.

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Improving Communication Skills

Sponsors

Robert M. Bethea and Sarah A. Brown (Texas Tech University)

Description

This module is designed to supplement junior and senior chemical engineering courses in which written or oral reports about experiments or other assignments are integral components. Examples of the proper format and style of student written work are included throughout. The module contains four files: Read Me First (instructions for access and use), Outline (the resource guide), and two Appendices.

The Outline emphasizes accuracy and clarity; the effective use of audience analysis; proper organization of material to focus on the conclusion or objective; and format, mechanics, consistency, voice, and tone for all types of communications. Business and technical correspondence, resumes, and various types of written reports including in-text citations and bibliographies are included. Because of the process safety implications for unit operations laboratory courses and undergraduate and graduate research projects, the crafting of safe, efficient, and effective operating procedures is presented as a separate section. The topic of visual aids to support oral presentations emphasizes clear, concise illustrations. The material on oral presentations is designed to focus on the bottom line or conclusions. The use of audience analysis is emphasized as are presentation styles, mechanics, and delivery. The style handbook begins with an intensive review of the parts of speech and their uses. This material is followed by the basic rules of English grammar and is illustrated by several pages of common mistakes. The elements of style and the use of smooth transitions are emphasized.

Five sets of student exercises composed of material taken from old unit operations laboratory reports are included as Appendix 1; these exercises focus on punctuation, grammar, style, and editing. Corrected versions of the student exercises are included as Appendix 2 which should not be distributed to students.

Student access: The files Outline.pdf and Appendix1.pdf are available to students logged into the site.

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Metal Structured Packing Fires

Sponsors

Mark T. Roberts (Texas A&M University)

Description

Metal structured packing fires represent a unique and poorly understood hazard. While a rare occurrence, the potential for capital damage and injury to personnel as a result of such fires is extremely high. Since metal is not often thought of as a combustible material, the risks associated with structured packing fires are magnified by a lack of appreciation and understanding of the risk of packing ignition involved in maintenance activities in an industrial separation tower.

This training module discusses the possible causes of metal structured packing fires and methods for preventing and suppressing metal fires taken from industrial experience. The module contains brief descriptions of actual incidents involving packing fires as well as questions intended for class discussion.

The module contains a Microsoft PowerPoint presentation with notes that would be appropriate for class presentation or independent study and a report on the topic. This training module is appropriate for a separations, process safety, or senior design class.

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